Sex Degrees of Separation Plugin

Recently I had the pleasure of working on quite a high profile plugin for Lloyds Pharmacy working as part of a team with Keith Devon of White Rock Design. The plugin was part of a campaign to run in Sexual Health week and was called Sex Degrees of Separation.

Lloyds wanted to educate people of the number of indirect sexual partners they will have had. The plugin has a front end interface where users simply enter the number of sexual partners they have had (male and female) in specific age groups. Once they hit calculate it crunches the numbers with some cool javascript (that bit was done by Keith!) and tells you your result. Click the image below to have a go!

Screen Shot 2015-09-24 at 13.58.08

My part in the plugin was to build all of the back-end functionality to allow the client to be able to edit the different parts of the plugin. For example editors can change the text output for the different sections as well as the button labels.

As the data changes over the current months/years they needed to be able to edit the data for each age group. This was achieved by creating a data edit screen in the WordPress admin. I went for a tabbed settings screen to separate the different settings into categories to make this easy to implement.

The plugin was launched a couple of weeks ago and received some amazing coverage in the press. Some links below are to some articles that I stumbled across:

Big thanks to Keith for bringing me in on the project.

Review a Plugin Today

Recently I was a guest on the Relative Paths podcast and had a great time chatting for Ben and Mark about WordPress plugin development. One things that came up was donations and reviews for plugins that I have in the repository and how many I get.

Many developers across the world develop open source software, of course not just for WordPress and they share it with the community to allow them to take advantage of that development. They do this without every earning any money and this takes time and energy.

Some of the best plugins for WordPress are completely free. The developers take their own time to develop them, improve them and then pass that onto the millions of WordPress users around the world.

One of the questions that came up in the podcast was do you ever receive any donations? My answer was straight forward in that I don’t, but I don’t really ask for them either. However one thing that I, and I know lots of other developers love receiving are positive reviews of our products [plugins], that tell the rest of the community how good (hopefully!) they are.

You can’t underestimate the feeling you get when someone indicates to you (I get an email from WordPress.org when someone reviews one of my plugins) that they are using your code (your plugin) on their site and they love it.

So if you use a plugin on lots and sites and you love, I urge you to go a give it a 5-star review on the WordPress.org plugin repository. It only takes a minute but the developer of the plugin will love it. Go and make their day!

I am off to do a few reviews myself now!

Broadbean Integration with WP Job Manager

For past couple of years I have worked on a plugin called WP Broadbean. This plugin integrates Broadbean‘s job Adcourier posting service with your WordPress site, allowing jobs posting through Broadbean to delivered to your site. While this plugin is working well, I have had multiple enquiries about integrating Broadbean job posting with the popular WP Job Manager plugin. Well today I am announcing that I can now offer this integration too. Let me explain a little more.

The WP Job Manager plugin is a plugin to provide Job board functionality to your WordPress site and was developed by Mike Jolly who works on the WooCommerce project. The plugin is very good and provides a jobs post type and associated taxonomies and meta fields for jobs, similar to the WP Broadbean plugin. It also has a nice AJAX style search built in to allow candidates to search for jobs in specific categories etc. as well as allowing candidates to apply for a job through the site.

These are mainly the features that the WP Broadbean plugin has. Although using my stand-alone plugin is more specific to Broadbean job posting itself, I can see the advantages of using the WP Job Manager plugin with its community and increased usage.

So onto my integration then. I have a built a WordPress plugin which acts as an addon for the WP Job Manager plugin. This provides an additional settings screen where site owners can create a username and password in order to setup their feed with Broadbean.

The plugin works even with sites that have registered additional fields in the WP Job Manager plugin so that it picks these up without any additional development, assuming of course they have been added correctly using the hooks and filters provided by WP Job Manager.

It also hooks into the application form to allow candidate applications made on the WordPress site to be tracked in from within Broadbean along with applications for other sources or job boards.

If you are interested in integrating Broadbean with the WordPress and the WP Job Manager plugin then please do get in touch for a quote.

Plugin Development on the Relative Paths Podcast

A few days ago I recorded a podcast with Ben and Mark from Relative Paths. We chatted about WordPress plugin development, adding plugin to WordPress.org Plugins as well as plugin maintenance and support. I thoroughly enjoyed chatting to Ben and Mark about WordPress – have a listen below.

Listen to more Relative Paths podcasts on Sound Cloud.